ARCHWALK SEASON 2019 IS HERE!

WE HAVE 5 WONDERFUL TOURS SET UP FOR THIS YEAR’S TOURS, THE FIRST BEGINNING IN MAY. TO ENSURE GETTING A TICKET TO THIS YEAR’S TOUR SERIES, CONSIDER BECOMING A MEMBER. TICKETS ARE OFFERED TO MEMBERS FIRST AND OFTEN SELL OUT WITHIN A WEEK.

DON’T MISS OUT ON THIS ENJOYABLE AND EDUCATIONAL TOUR SERIES IN BOISE.

Tours are offered at noon (12:00 - 1:15 pm) and at early evening (6:30-7:45PM).  Ticket packages include all 5 ArchWalk tours given on the 4th Thursday of the summer months.

We have a great lineup of tours this year, and are venturing outside of Boise once again, this time for a walk through old town Kuna.  We are very excited to see you this season and to join you in learning more stories about the places surrounding us.

 
 
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May 30: Boom and Bust! Boise During the roaring ‘20s and the great depression

Presented by Doug Stan, History Teacher and Preservation Idaho Board Member

Join local history teacher and Preservation Idaho board member Doug Stan on a walk through Boise’s past. On our walk, we’ll check out Boise of the roaring twenties, a boom period in local architecture featuring downtown buildings such as the Egyptian Theater and Hotel Boise. Boiseans enjoyed the good times in their city in dance halls, theaters, and even illegal speakeasies. The good times hit the skids in 1930 however, and Boise reflected the hard times through the need for government employment programs and federal building. We’ll walk by the only downtown bank to make it through the Depression and several important WPA built landmarks. Come imagine what it must have been like to go from party times to hard times in downtown Boise.   

 
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June 27: Old Town Kuna

Presented by Sharon Fisher, Historian

If the only reason you go to Kuna is for Mexican food, you’re missing out on history.

Founded in 1882 as the closest train station to Boise, it was shut down in 1887. But thanks to irrigation, the town came back to life in the early 20th century. Several of its downtown commercial buildings date back to 1915 (one of which is on the National Register) and the “old town” residential area features a variety of houses from that era including foursquare, Queen Anne, Moorish Revival, and Dutch Colonial—as well as good old vernacular. Unlike the old days, when it was a day-long dusty stagecoach ride from Boise to Kuna, today it’s just 20 minutes on the highway. So come check out Kuna.

You can always have Mexican food afterwards.

Sharon Fisher has lived in Kuna for almost 20 years. She is an amateur historian and the author of Images of America: Kuna by Arcadia PublishingShe serves on the Ada County Historic Preservation Council, the Kuna Arts Commission, and is a member of the Kuna Historical Society. 

 
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July 25: Time Travel–The Thatcher Addition

Presented by Barbara Perry Bauer, Historian and TAG Historical Research Owner

The Thatcher Addition, located near Sixth and Thatcher, was platted in the 1890s by D.H. Andrews on the outskirts of Boise as the city was growing north. A desirable residential district at the turn of the 20th century, homes in the area reflect popular styles of the day and were built by a number of enterprising men and women. Join historian Barbara Perry Bauer on an exploration of this turn-of-the century neighborhood.

 
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August 22: Boise’s Bureaucrats—State Street’s Notable Houses of Public Servants from the 1900s

Presented by Gaby Thomason, Historian and Preservation Idaho’s Programs Director

Join historian and Preservation Idaho’s programs director Gaby Thomason for a tour of Boise’s State Street Historic District. This National Historic District is significant not only for its architectural diversity at the turn of the 19th century, but also for the individuals and families the houses were built for. Come discover the original location of the Adelmann House that now sits in the Pioneer Village next to the Idaho History Museum, the home of Frank Dietrich—the man Dietrich, ID was named after, the “new and exceedingly effective” architectural style built for Governor Morrison by J. Flood Walker, and more.

 

 
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September 26: The Near West End: Old Timers and Newcomers

Presented by Dan Everhart, Architectural Historian

Join architectural historian Dan Everhart to explore the fascinating history of the Near West End. This neighborhood at the edge of downtown is a diverse mixture of building types, styles, and uses, but new additions, new neighbors, and new development may forever change this unique corner of the city. Participants will get a chance to see the threatened Travis Apartments and Sturiale Place—a restaurant which occupies a house moved from Central Addition by Rita Sturiale in 2015.