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Mad for Mod

A few weeks ago I toured one of Boise’s most architecturally significant homes from the mid-20th century. Designed by Jedd Jones of the Boise architectural firm of Hummel, Hummel, and Jones, the house at 105 E. Highland Drive was designed in 1967 for Ethel Chapman—owner of The Mode department store in downtown Boise.

105 E. Highland Drive, Boise

As you can imagine, Chapman, Boise’s fashion maven, spared no expense in the commission of her home where modernist design features include interior and exterior walls faced in quartzite, an exquisite, multi-vaulted pavilion roof/ceiling in the living room, and stunning views of downtown. The home is now for sale by its third owner, Dorothy Stimpson who commissioned a sympathetic addition in the late 1990s—going so far as to have the original source of the quartzite re-opened in Oregon. See photos of the house on Preservation Idaho’s Flickr page.

Mrs. Stimpson’s care for the home cannot be universally found in owners of mid-century architecture. Too often, important structures from the 1950s, 60s, and 70s are altered beyond recognition by owners or developers bent on “modernization” of their property. The irony of “modernizing” modernist buildings is apparently lost on those who feel it necessary. Happily, a growing segment of the nation’s population has begun to exhibit a newfound interest in the art and architecture of the recent past.

Robert Imber giving a bus tour in Palm Springs as part of Modernism WeekI recently spent half a day in the convention center at Palm Springs, California distributing information on the value of mid-century design and the efforts of the National Trust for Historic Preservation (NTHP) to draw attention to its importance. The NTHP has recently launched their Modernism + Recent Past program, also known as TrustModern directed by Christine Madrid French out of the Trust’s Western Regional Office in San Francisco. In the past few years the NTHP has added modernist icons such as Philip Johnson’s Glass House in Connecticut and the Farnsworth House outside Chicago designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe to their portfolio of nationwide historic sites. TrustModern has also launched a Modern Modules series studying the modernist architectural collections of cities/regions around the nation including Los Angeles, the Twin Cities, and Boston.

Though not the focus of a Modern Module, Palm Springs is a globally acclaimed mecca of modernist design that has seen a recent renaissance with tourism focused less on sun and golf and more on the architecture the makes the city unique. An annual Modernism Week draws thousands of participants from around the world who flock to this small city in the desert to attend the modernist art and furniture show, take tours of mid-century architecture, and party like movie stars at the homes of celebrities from the 1950s and 1960s. Partners in the promotion the week-long series of events include the Palm Springs Historical Society, the Palm Springs Preservation Foundation, the Palm Springs Modern Committee, and the California Preservation Foundation.

Preservation Idaho’s recognition of the importance of these resources began in earnest in 2008 when it co-hosted a symposium in Boise titled Modernism in the Northwest: Mid-century Architecture – Identification and Evaluation. Drawing participants from across the country, the symposium featured lectures, a bus tour, and a party at a fabulous mid-century home in Boise’s foothills. We will soon launch Idaho Modern, to promote the appreciation and awareness of mid-century, modernist, and recent past architecture and design in Idaho through education and advocacy. With hard work and the support of other like-minded Idahoans, the Chapman House and those like it will be valued for their modernist aesthetic rather than dismissed as mid-century mistakes.
 

Comments

TrustModern has also launched

TrustModern has also launched a Modern Modules series studying the modernist architectural collections of cities/regions around the nation including Los Angeles, the Twin Cities, and Boston.

Had the wonderful opportunity

Had the wonderful opportunity to enjoy a small dinner party that she and Ed hosted. I agree the home is really cool.

Nice post Dan. I did not know

Nice post Dan. I did not know Dottie's home is going up for sale. Had the wonderful opportunity to enjoy a small dinner party that she and Ed hosted. I agree the home is really cool.

Looking forward to Idaho Modern

Nice post Dan. I did not know Dottie's home is going up for sale. Had the wonderful opportunity to enjoy a small dinner party that she and Ed hosted. I agree the home is really cool. I recall it being elegant and unfussy with that gorgeous view. It is a great home for entertaining, and I'm not surprised that Dottie and Ed knew how to keep it classic.

Can't wait for Idaho Modern

Nice blog Dan. Great to hear about your experience in Palm Springs with NTHP. Boise's image is certainly one more of the turn of the century/early 20th century downtown buildings and not these gems found around town. We're looking forward to talking with PI more about our ongoing research into Troutner's buildings in Idaho as well. Thanks for the info!

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